Bobwhites on the Brink

Welcome to the five-part series “Bobwhites on the Brink.” For several months, NBCI worked with a syndicated public TV show, This American Land, to examine the “big picture” of the bobwhite decline in settings that once produced copious quantities of quail and no longer do – forests, row crop farming and cattle grazing. For examples of each we visited South Carolina (forestry), Texas and Kentucky (livestock grazing), and Kansas (row crop agriculture) to see how these activities have changed over the decades and how public and private landowners, and public policy makers can make room for bobwhites and other grassland birds once again.

Bobwhites on the Brink

Welcome to the five-part series “Bobwhites on the Brink.” For several months, NBCI worked with a syndicated public TV show, This American Land, to examine the “big picture” of the bobwhite decline in settings that once produced copious quantities of quail and no longer do – forests, row crop farming and cattle grazing. For examples of each we visited South Carolina (forestry), Texas and Kentucky (livestock grazing), and Kansas (row crop agriculture) to see how these activities have changed over the decades and how public and private landowners, and public policy makers can make room for bobwhites and other grassland birds once again.

Bobwhites on the Brink

Welcome to the five-part series “Bobwhites on the Brink.” For several months, NBCI worked with a syndicated public TV show, This American Land, to examine the “big picture” of the bobwhite decline in settings that once produced copious quantities of quail and no longer do – forests, row crop farming and cattle grazing. For examples of each we visited South Carolina (forestry), Texas and Kentucky (livestock grazing), and Kansas (row crop agriculture) to see how these activities have changed over the decades and how public and private landowners, and public policy makers can make room for bobwhites and other grassland birds once again.

Bobwhites on the Brink

Welcome to the five-part series “Bobwhites on the Brink.” For several months, NBCI worked with a syndicated public TV show, This American Land, to examine the “big picture” of the bobwhite decline in settings that once produced copious quantities of quail and no longer do – forests, row crop farming and cattle grazing. For examples of each we visited South Carolina (forestry), Texas and Kentucky (livestock grazing), and Kansas (row crop agriculture) to see how these activities have changed over the decades and how public and private landowners, and public policy makers can make room for bobwhites and other grassland birds once again.

Bobwhites on the Brink

Welcome to the five-part series “Bobwhites on the Brink.” For several months, NBCI worked with a syndicated public TV show, This American Land, to examine the “big picture” of the bobwhite decline in settings that once produced copious quantities of quail and no longer do – forests, row crop farming and cattle grazing. For examples of each we visited South Carolina (forestry), Texas and Kentucky (livestock grazing), and Kansas (row crop agriculture) to see how these activities have changed over the decades and how public and private landowners, and public policy makers can make room for bobwhites and other grassland birds once again.


David Ledford, director of the Appalachian Wildlife Foundation and chairman of the newly-activated NBTC Mine Lands Subcommittee, addressed the annual NBTC meeting in Roanoke, VA recently. He talks about the potential for grasslands wildlife habitat as a reclamation avenue for mined lands and what he believes to be coal’s future based on demand from western Europe and other parts of the world. (Lighting isn’t great, but audio is ok.)

2013 NBTC:Unifying an Early-Succession Habitat Message Dr. Todd Fearer, AMJV


Appearing at the annual meeting of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee in Roanoke, VA recently, Dr. Fearer, coordinator of the Appalachian Mountains Joint Venture, explained the history and role of joint ventures, the efforts and successes of the Appalachian Mountains Joint Venture, and how many wildlife species benefit from their work.