Around the Nation

Field & Stream Joins QF Saturday on Missouri Quail Habitat Project

Quail Forever, Field & Stream Invite Bloomfield, Missouri Area Residents to Become Conservation Heroes
Magazine Joins Quail Forever Chapter to Improve Missouri Quail Habitat

Event is Open to the Public

St. Paul, Minn. – On Saturday, June 15, Field & Stream will join the Bootheel Bobwhites Chapter of Quail Forever, and local volunteers in a one-day, hands-on outdoor conservation project to aid the group’s efforts to improve quail habitat in Missouri, as part of the magazine’s Hero for a Day program. Read more about the bobwhite habitat effort HERE.

 

Southeast Farm Press: Do Native Grasses Have a Place on Alabama Farms?

NBCI has used the recent drought to work with agricultural interests in Washington and beyond to give serious consideration to the use of drought-tolerant, warm-season native grasses in livestock operations. An increasing number of agricultural interests, including publications, are picking up on the value of native grasses for livestock producers … and wildlife. Here’s another story from the Southeast Farm Press, this one regarding the value of native grasses in Alabama:

“A strange thing happened on the way toward settling North America. The cattle first brought to this continent centuries ago quickly eliminated native grass stands through overgrazing, leaving European settlers scrambling for transplanted grasses and clover.

“Consequently, those pastureland grasses we typically assume are as American as apple pie — bermudagrass and Kentucky bluegrass, for example — aren’t.

“We regularly plant 50 to 60 forage species, and hardly any of these are native grasses,” says Don Ball, an Alabama Cooperative Extension System forage specialist and Auburn University professor of agronomy and soils.

“Bermudagrass presumably first arrived in cattle feed brought over by Fernando de Soto. By the 19thcentury, it was being used as both a pasture grass and as a way to reduce soil erosion.

“Likewise, Kentucky bluegrass is anything but Kentuckian. It grew in Europe and Africa before it was brought to North America by early settlers.”

To read the complete story regarding using native grasses in Alabama agricultural operations, click HERE.

Southeast Farm Press: Native warm-season grasses weather drought, provide many other benefits

Native warm-season grasses fair well during drought, and livestock and forage producers are turning to them for these benefits, NRCS scientists say.

Many landowners are converting a portion of their land to these grasses and other native plants, taking advantage of their benefits, including tolerance to drought, food for livestock, habitat for wildlife and other ecosystem services.


A native plant is one that has grown in an area since before human settlement and was not brought in more recently from other parts of the world. Natives, when planted in the right place, grow stronger and yield more benefits than non-natives.

“They are the ultimate multi-use range and land management tools because of their tremendous capabilities,” said Kyle Brazil, USDA’s Farm Service Agency National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative Agricultural Policy coordinator. Read more about the benefits of native grasses to producers and wildlife HERE.

Bobwhite Foundation Gets $1M Commitment

New Bobwhite Foundation Gets $1 Million Commitment

As a Challenge for Additional Contributions

A bobwhite enthusiast in Texas kicked off fundraising for the new Bobwhite Foundation this week with a $100,000 endowment … and a promise to match up to $1 million in “endowed” donations from any other source within the next two years.

Joe Crafton, founder and chair of Park Cities Quail in Dallas, made the announcement via video to a meeting of the Management Board of the National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI) at the North American Wildlife & Natural Resources Conference in Arlington, VA Tuesday.  A graduate of the University of Tennessee, Crafton is CEO and president of CROSSMARK, a leading sales and marketing services company in the consumer goods industry headquartered in Dallas.

In his recorded video message to the NBCI Management Board, Crafton said he had grown up in West Tennessee hunting bobwhite quail on the ancestral farm with his father, who had grown up quail hunting there with his father. His father was devastated at the quail decline, but Crafton said he personally was “thrilled” to see populations of bobwhites when he moved to the Lone Star State, where he proceeded to establish the Park Cities Quail organization. The organization has raised more than $3 million for quail research in the state. Crafton was also instrumental in the founding of the Quail Coalition, linking 12 independent, private quail groups around the state.

Crafton said there are many good things going on for quail in various states, including Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas and Kentucky, and he wants to ensure those things are communicated and coordinated as best practices across the range and to the public. Repeating outdoor columnist Tom Davis’ description of the bobwhite situation as “our greatest wildlife tragedy,” Crafton said “there are a lot of people who would like to contribute and don’t know how … my father would have contributed to the Bobwhite Foundation if it had existed … I’m confident throughout the South and Midwest we have lots of passionate quail hunters who are doing their estate planning and can contribute to this cause.”

“Bobwhite restoration is unlike any species restoration that’s been attempted,” said NBCI Director Don McKenzie. “Deer, turkey and elk were relatively simple and straightforward. Habitat existed and we moved animals there. Much like waterfowl restoration, bobwhite restoration is a habitat issue. “Bobwhites didn’t disappear overnight and they won’t recover that way either… which means it’s a multi-year challenge requiring a long-term commitment.  This is the first critical step in assuring that the bobwhite restoration effort has reliable funding to continue long-term. Joe’s passion for bobwhites and his willingness to launch the foundation’s efforts are immensely important and we are extremely thankful for his leadership in this arena,” McKenzie said.

The Bobwhite Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization established to support the goals and objectives of NBCI, primarily by recreating habitat by “reconnecting” forest management with quail, cattle production with quail, pursing quail habitat possibilities on reclaimed mine lands and communicating to the public the urgent nature of the decline of habitat for quail and other wildlife species around the nation.

For more information on the foundation, go to www.bobwhitefoundation.org. For more details on NBCI, go to www.bringbackbobwhites.org.

Headquartered at the University of Tennessee, NBCI is a project of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) to elevate bobwhite quail recovery from an individual state-by-state proposition to a range-wide, policy-level leadership endeavor. The committee is comprised of representatives of state fish and wildlife agencies, academic research institutions and non-governmental conservation organizations. NBCI is funded by the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation, 25 state wildlife management agencies, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and Southern Company.