NBCI News

Registration Open for 2017 NBTC Annual Meeting & Quail 8: Both Set for Last Full Week of July in Knoxville, TN

Registration for the Joint Quail Conference of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) annual meeting July 25-26, and the eighth national quail symposia, July 27-28, is now open. Both will be at the Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown in Knoxville, Tennessee. Registration information for both can be accessed at https://www.quailcount.org/quail8/home.html and discount pricing is available through March 31.

NBTC is a focused committee-oriented meeting of member biologists, managers, researchers and private conservation group representatives who review and set the agenda for the National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI), based at the University of Tennessee – Knoxville (UTK). NBCI works with 25 state wildlife agencies and the research institutions and private conservation groups for large-scale restoration of wild bobwhite quail populations, and  is the most comprehensive effort on behalf of a resident game bird in the history of wildlife management.

Quail 8, a science symposium for biologists around the nation and beyond, will feature 94 presentations and posters on various aspects of quail management and research, and is expected to attract 300 or more attendees. A proceedings is part of registration and will be available following the conference via the University of Tennessee-Knoxville Online Marketplace.

The NBTC annual meeting is hosted by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) in cooperation with UTK. Quail 8 is hosted by UTK, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, NBCI and NBTC. For more information about the NBTC and NBCI, go to www.bringbackbobwhites.org.

For information regarding Quail 8, please visit https://www.quailcount.org/quail8/home.html. Previous symposia are available at the Online Marketplace and  https://www.quailcount.org/quail8/library.html.

About NBCI

Headquartered at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture’s Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, NBCI is an initiative of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) to elevate bobwhite quail recovery from an individual state-by-state proposition to a coordinated, range-wide leadership endeavor. The committee is comprised of representatives of 25 state wildlife agencies, various academic research institutions and private conservation organizations. Support for NBCI is provided by the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Program, state wildlife agencies, the Joe Crafton Family Endowment for Quail Initiatives, the University of Tennessee and Park Cities Quail.  

Arkansas Hires Native Son for Big Bobwhite Push

 

The Arkansas Game & Fish Commission recently hired native son Marcus Asher as its full-time “quail program coordinator” to lead the state’s mounting bobwhite restoration efforts.

Marcus Asher, Arkansas’ new bobwhite coordinator

With a B.S. in Wildlife Ecology and Management from Arkansas State University and three years of research on bobwhites and early-successional songbirds, the Jonesboro, AR native worked the past five years as a private land conservationist with the Missouri Department of Conservation. Prior to that, he was a soil conservation technician with the Natural Resources Conservation Service in Tamms, IL, and as an area technician III with the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. He also holds certifications in basic fire training, prescribed burn boss training and prescribed burn plan writing.

Asher says his immediate priorities include revising and expanding bobwhite management efforts on selected state wildlife management areas, enticing adjacent private landowners to implement quail-friendly practices to increase usable space on a larger, landscape scale, developing strategies for keeping those landowners engaged long-term, convincing other land-owning partner entities to embrace the state’s quail management priority and strengthening the commission’s public education and outreach efforts targeting bobwhites.

Bobwhites have become a hot topic in Arkansas. Earlier this month, the commission convened a day-and-a-half meeting on bobwhites with their biologists, wildlife management area managers and several experts from other states to share their experiences.  Just last month Arkansas was one of eight states included in a National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI) proposal approved by the Natural Resources Conservation Service under its Working Lands For Wildlife program. It will provide technical and financial assistance to landowners interested in converting exotic, endophyte-infected fescue pastures to drought-tolerant native grasses and wildflowers, along with developing prescribed grazing plans. Arkansas also has the nation’s first NBCI bobwhite focal area anchored by a National Park Service unit, Pea Ridge National Military Park.

“The state of Arkansas has numerous bobwhite conservation assets in place that add cumulative value to a growing restoration movement,” said NBCI Director Don McKenzie. “The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission now is standing up to provide the necessary leadership that can coalesce those assets into a potent force that I expect will make major progress in coming years.”

Asher is stationed at 1125 Hwy 56, Calico Rock, AR 72519. He can be contacted at 870-291-4243 or Marcus.asher@agfc.ar.gov.

 

About NBCI

Headquartered at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture’s Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, NBCI is an initiative of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) to elevate bobwhite quail recovery from an individual state-by-state proposition to a coordinated, range-wide leadership endeavor. The committee is comprised of representatives of 25 state wildlife agencies, various academic research institutions and private conservation organizations. Support for NBCI is provided by the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Program, state wildlife agencies, the Joe Crafton Family Endowment for Quail Initiatives, the University of Tennessee and Park Cities Quail. For more information, please visit www.bringbackbobwhites.org and find us on Facebook, YouTube and Slideshare.

 

NBCI Says Approval of Bobwhites for ‘Working Lands’ Program Improves Odds of Landscape Scale Restoration of Native Bird

The National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI) moved a step closer to two of its major goals for landscape restoration of wild bobwhites – reconnecting cattle and quail, and reconnecting forests and quail – when the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announced the approval Tuesday of two NBCI-led proposals to recognize bobwhites in the NRCS Working Lands for Wildlife (WLFW) program.

When announcing approval of the projects on a Missouri farm, NRCS Chief Jason Weller said “We were really pumped to receive two bobwhite proposals. These projects represent what’s best for America—family ownership, conservation, helping communities and partnerships.”

“With a goal of affecting 232,000 targeted acres in 13 states by fiscal year 2018, this WLFW accomplishment may be the largest concentrated effort ever applied to reintegrating wild bobwhites into this nation’s working landscapes,” said NBCI Director Don McKenzie.

The grasslands proposal targets 150,000 acres in eight states — Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia — and will provide technical and financial assistance to landowners interested in converting pastures of exotic, endophyte-infected fescue to drought-tolerant native grasses and wildflowers, along with developing prescribed grazing plans.

“It is estimated that as much as 85% of tall fescue is infected with an endophyte fungus that causes cattle a wide range of problems,” said McKenzie. “And as a cool-season grass, fescue doesn’t produce nearly as well as natives during the droughty summer months. A strategic landscape-scale mixture of native warm-season grasses and forbs that complement prevalent introduced cool-season forages will help producers, cattle, quail and other grasslands wildlife.”

Additionally, the Center for Native Grasslands Management at the University of Tennessee has offered to provide “Train the Trainer” sessions for partner biologists and NRCS staff on establishing and managing native grasses for grazing and wildlife.

The forestlands proposal targets 82,000 acres across six states –  Alabama, Florida, Georgia, New Jersey, North Carolina and South Carolina – and will provide technical and financial assistance to landowners interested in restoring declining pine savanna habitat using native grasses, timber thinning and prescribed fire.  Pine savanna is a diverse ecosystem supporting bobwhites and more than 300 other species.

“These projects, which are very targeted for maximum impact, were coordinated by NBCI and approved by the NRCS State Conservationists in each participating state,” said McKenzie.  “Numerous close partners played key roles, including the UT Center for Native Grasslands Management, the Central Hardwoods Joint Venture, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, NRCS state and regional offices, various state wildlife agency quail coordinators, and the National Bobwhite Technical Committee’s grasslands/grazing lands, agriculture and forestry subcommittees.”

Grasslands and Savanah Projects for Bobwhite

About NBCI

Headquartered at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture’s Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, NBCI is an initiative of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) to elevate bobwhite quail recovery from an individual state-by-state proposition to a coordinated, range-wide leadership endeavor. The committee is comprised of representatives of 25 state wildlife agencies, various academic research institutions and private conservation organizations. Support for NBCI is provided by the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Program, state wildlife agencies, the Joe Crafton Family Endowment for Quail Initiatives, the University of Tennessee and Park Cities Quail. For more information, please visit www.bringbackbobwhites.org and find us on Facebook, YouTube and Slideshare.

‘NatiVeg’: NBCI Releases Online Tool to Aid Native Plant Selection

 

nativeg-iconThe National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI) has taken another significant step in the recovery of native vegetation and habitats on the landscape across the 25 NBCI states with the release of a new decision-making tool, NatiVeg, NBCI Director Don McKenzie announced today. 

“With restoration of native grasses, wildflowers and shrubs across the landscape being a critical means to the recovery of bobwhite, grassland bird and pollinator populations, NBCI’s NatiVeg will make it significantly easier for landowners and resource managers to select the right native plants for their specific location and specific purpose,” said  McKenzie.

NatiVeg (www.quailcount.org/NatiVeg) is a remote, Internet-based tool that works on desktops, laptops, tablets and mobile phones. Developed by NBCI and University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Information Technology Service and beta-tested by a variety of outside reviewers, NatiVeg is a database that, within the 25-state initiative’s range, delivers the proper native plant choices for a specific location and the user’s specific purposes, whether wildlife, forage, biomass, pollinators, critical area planting, restoration or soil conservation. That location can be specified either manually or by a connected mobile device’s GPS system. And the provided recommendations discriminate, for instance, between a big bluestem grass adapted to Texas and one adapted to Alabama based on location.

An eight-month project, NBCI first captured the database for the 126 Natural Resource Conservation Service’s (NRCS) Major Land Resource Areas (eco-regions) for the 25 NBCI states and secured the NRCS database of plant materials identified as suitable for conservation purposes. NBCI deleted from that list all non-native species, tree species and other species not applicable to the NBCI states, leaving only native grasses, shrubs, forbs and legumes in an eventual 306-species menu. NBCI then folded in a plant hardiness zone database into the mix.  Also provided is a species “Location Assistance” button that delivers information from the respective state wildlife agency, including contact information for experts.

“There are still shortcomings to overcome,” McKenzie said. “For instance, there are many plants that NRCS has not done any work with, so are not included. In addition, there won’t be as many choices east of the Mississippi River because NRCS has worked more on western species. So, NatiVeg is a work in progress.

“We encourage landowners and resource managers to check out this new tool,” McKenzie said, “to help improve their native grassland restoration efforts, and we ask for feedback from users, to help NBCI continually improve this unique wildlife conservation service.”

For questions and more specific information, contact NBCI Grasslands Coordinator Jef Hodges at jhodge34@utk.edu or at 660-351-2766.

About NBCI

Headquartered at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture’s Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, NBCI is an initiative of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) to elevate bobwhite quail recovery from an individual state-by-state proposition to a coordinated, range-wide leadership endeavor. The committee is comprised of representatives of 25 state wildlife agencies, various academic research institutions and private conservation organizations. Support for NBCI is provided by the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Program, state wildlife agencies, the Joe Crafton Family Endowment for Quail Initiatives, the University of Tennessee and Park Cities Quail. For more information, please visit www.bringbackbobwhites.org and find us on Facebook, YouTube and Slideshare.

NBCI Issues 6th ‘State of the Bobwhite’ Report

State of the Bobwhite 2016

State of the Bobwhite 2016

A new campaign to support using native grasses in federally-subsidized conservation programs on agricultural lands and the creation of a new technical website tailored to the needs of state biologists for reporting and analyzing habitat assessment and bobwhite/songbird monitoring results are among but a few of the highlights in the 6th State of the Bobwhite Report 2016 from the National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI).

The 66-page annual report also examines a creative approach in Arkansas for monitoring a bobwhite focal area at Pea Ridge National Battlefield, the new relationship between NBCI and the U.S. Forest Service and what it means for bobwhite restoration on national forests, as well as delving into an enormous amount of bobwhite research being conducted in Oklahoma.  Also included are reports from states on their accomplishments in bobwhite conservation.

Check out “NBCI’s Bobwhite Almanac, State of the Bobwhite 2016” on the NBCI website at http://bringbackbobwhites.org/download/nbcis-bobwhite-almanac-state-of-the-bobwhite-2016/.  

About NBCI

Headquartered at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture’s Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, NBCI is an initiative of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) to elevate bobwhite quail recovery from an individual state-by-state proposition to a coordinated, range-wide leadership endeavor. The committee is comprised of representatives of 25 state wildlife agencies, various academic research institutions and private conservation organizations. Support for NBCI is provided by the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Program, state wildlife agencies, the Joe Crafton Family Endowment for Quail Initiatives, the University of Tennessee and Park Cities Quail. For more information, please visit www.bringbackbobwhites.org and find us on Facebook, YouTube and Slideshare.

NBCI Agreement with National Park Service Brings New Ally to Bobwhite Restoration

Bobwhites, native plant species and pollinators have a new ally in their corner with the recent signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between the National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI) and the U.S. Department of the Interior’s National Park Service (NPS).

Inked recently at the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies annual meeting in Philadelphia, PA, the pact allows the two entities to work together with the NBCI state wildlife agencies to collaboratively identify and restore native grasslands habitats on suitable park properties, with certain park units serving as bobwhite focal areas. NPS officials have initially indicated there are as many as 20 parks across 10 states that have expressed interest in potentially participating in a project focused on grassland restoration and focal area development.

NBCI’s Coordinated Implement Program requires NBCI focal areas to have a minimum of 1,500 acres along with specific and consistent measures of habitat quality, bobwhite and grassland songbird response and bobwhite covey measurements. Sixteen states have created one or more of these areas, and more states are in the planning stages. The first focal area in Arkansas (and the first on NPS property) is centered around Pea Ridge National Military Park, which demonstrated the viability of NPS involvement.

“NBCI’s Coordinated Implementation Program has strong appeal to a variety of outside parties,” said NBCI Director Don McKenzie. “The National Park Service is a unique and unexpected ally that brings an entire suite of new resources to the table, including a public land base, management staff and technical expertise, and they want to contribute to the effort. Their participation offers a number of positives, including continued expansion of bobwhite restoration across the range, the development of new source populations of bobwhites, opportunities to expand park-based efforts to adjacent public and private lands, and new opportunities to tell the story of bobwhite and grassland bird decline to a broad public audience,” McKenzie said.

“As part of the NPS mission, it is important for us to educate visitors on the value of our natural and cultural heritage,” said NPS Ecologist Jordan Spaak. “Many historical records indicate that bobwhite quail were an integral part of grassland and savannah ecosystems. It makes good sense for the NPS to help tell the story of why grassland flora and fauna have declined and what the NPS and our partners are doing to manage, restore, and conserve native plant species, pollinators, bobwhites, and the ecosystems these species occupy.  We see NBCI and the states as valuable partners, bringing to the table a landscape-scale, habitat-based strategic plan for grassland species, as well as the national leadership, coordination, and capacity to help accelerate the process.”

 

About NBCI

Headquartered at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture’s Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, NBCI is an initiative of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) to elevate bobwhite quail recovery from an individual state-by-state proposition to a coordinated, range-wide leadership endeavor. The committee is comprised of representatives of 25 state wildlife agencies, various academic research institutions and private conservation organizations. Support for NBCI is provided by the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Program, state wildlife agencies, the University of Tennessee and Park Cities Quail. For more information, please visit www.bringbackbobwhites.org and find us on Facebook, www.facebook.com/bringbackbobwhites  and YouTube www.youtube.com/user/BringBackBobwhites .

 About the National Park Service

 More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America’s 413 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Visit us at www.nps.gov, on Facebook www.facebook.com/nationalparkservice, Twitter www.twitter.com/natlparkservice, and YouTube www.youtube.com/nationalparkservice.

NPS Contact:

Jordan Spaak-Ecologist

National Park Service

Biological Resources Division

Natural Resource Stewardship and Science Directorate

970-267-2145

Jordan_Spaak@nps.gov

‘Bobwhites on the Brink’ Examines Decline, Restoration Effort for Iconic Native Bird

 

“Bobwhites on the Brink,” a five-part series by the syndicated television conservation news magazine This American Land airing this fall, examines the reasons for the decline of the iconic northern bobwhite and efforts to restore it on the American landscape.

The National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI) and various states worked over a period of months to help develop the story. Crews visited South Carolina, Texas, Kentucky and Kansas to illustrate how a decline in active forest management, the conversion of livestock grazing operations from native grasses to exotic fescue across millions of acres at taxpayer expense, and the hyper-growth of mechanized clean-farming techniques in row crop agriculture over time have combined to decimate habitat range-wide for bobwhites and other grassland birds and wildlife species.  

In the first segment (#601), the show examines forest management trends, which have seen the majority of grassy forest and woodland savannas that historically harbored bobwhites and numerous other species dwindle to a tiny fraction of their original range, often to be replaced with overgrown, stagnant and unhealthy forests ripe for wildfires and insect invasions. Wildlife and forest managers in South Carolina show how thinning and regular prescribed fire are bringing “bob” back to the woods.

The second segment (#602) illustrates how ranchers in Texas are successfully grazing livestock in pastures of native grasses alongside bobwhites, in contrast to producers in many other states who have replaced native grasses with the exotic fescue, which offers little for wildlife and has detrimental impacts on cattle health.

Segment three (#603)  visits the epicenter of fescue, Kentucky, to observe what fescue has done to the landscape there and in other states, and how some producers are reverting to native grasses to benefit not only cattle growth and health but also bobwhites and other grassland species.

Segment four (#604) takes viewers to Kansas to see how agricultural operations in the U.S. have morphed from small field/multi-farm operations to giant corporate expanses of  row crop acreage, and how Kansas is leading the country in demonstrating how bobwhite habitat can still be successfully integrated on these working lands.

The last segment (#605) summarizes the issues and obstacles that have pushed bobwhites and other grassland species from the landscape, and the strategies being used by a multitude of states and the NBCI to ensure their continued role in rural American life.

“We hope this effort will move public understanding up a notch on what has happened to the bobwhite and an array of other grasslands wildlife species, including pollinators, and what we all can do to ensure this iconic bird remains on our nation’s rural landscapes,” said NBCI Director Don McKenzie.

Because This American Land is a syndicated program, not all public television stations broadcast it. If they do subscribe to the program they also have the option to air it on dates and at times of their choosing, so viewers are encouraged to check the programming schedule of their local public television affiliate.

The series (#601, #602, #603, #604, #605) can also be viewed on the This American Land website at http://www.thisamericanland.org/Episodes/season-six, on NBCI’s YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/BringBackBobwhites or on the NBCI website at http://bringbackbobwhites.org/category/the-bobwhite-library/videos/nbci-bobwhite-theater/

Copies of the programming are also being distributed to the quail coordinators of the 25 NBCI states for use in the field with a variety of audiences.

For more information about NBCI, please visit www.bringbackbobwhites.org.

 

About NBCI

Headquartered at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture’s Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, NBCI is an initiative of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) to elevate bobwhite quail recovery from an individual state-by-state proposition to a coordinated, range-wide leadership endeavor. The committee is comprised of representatives of 25 state wildlife agencies, various academic research institutions and private conservation organizations. Support for NBCI is provided by the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Program, state wildlife agencies, the University of Tennessee and Park Cities Quail. For more information, please visit www.bringbackbobwhites.org and find us on Facebook, YouTube and Slideshare.

 

National Bobwhite Group Honors Dr. Leonard Brennan for Career Contributions

 

LINCOLN, Nebraska — The National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) honored Dr. Leonard A. Brennan of Texas with its Award for Individual Achievement at its annual meeting in Lincoln,

Dr. Leonard Brennan

Dr. Leonard Brennan

NE, recently. The award is presented to recognize an individual’s overall contributions to bobwhite research and/or management during a career.

NBTC cited Dr. Brennan, a professor who holds the C.C. Winn Endowed Chair in the Richard M. Kleberg Jr. Center for Quail Research at Texas A&M University, Kingsville, specifically for his positive national influence on quail management, and his support of NBTC and the National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI) within the wildlife profession during his 33-year career.

In addition, NBTC recognized Dr. Brennan’s research on six species of quail across nine states, his more than 170 scientific publications and more than 105 extension publications, many of which established the course for today’s quail management and research activities. Dr. Brennan was also a central figure in the South Texas region’s designation as the first-ever NBCI Legacy Landscape for Northern Bobwhite Conservation. He was also editor of the award-winning 2006 book, Texas Quails: Ecology and Management, Texas A&M University Press.

Dr. Brennan has also been actively involved in the NBTC (and its predecessor, the Southeastern Quail Study Group) as the elected “academic representative” on the groups’ respective steering committees, and has played an integral role in the national quail symposium series – leading a national strategic workshop for Quail 3, chairing and editing Quail 4, and serving as an associate editor for the upcoming Quail 8 in Knoxville, Tennessee.

‘This American Land’ TV Show Examines Bobwhite Decline

Bobwhite and grassland songbird enthusiasts may want to check their local public television outlet for the program “This American Land,” Season 6. The season’s first five episodes – Bobwhites on the Brink – join the National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI) and biologists in several states to examine the decline of bobwhites and associated species caused primarily by changes in the way we manage forests, grow crops and graze cattle – and what can be done to make room for them on the landscape again. The accompanying trailer, compliments of This American Land, provides a sneak peek.

https://vimeo.com/album/4086985/video/178249017

NBCI Takes Major Step in Supporting State Priorities for National Coordination, Measurement of Bobwhite Restoration

 

The National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI) has taken another major step in supporting the bobwhite restoration priorities of the NBCI member states with the development of its highly anticipated technical website, www.quailcount.org.

“The launch of Quailcount.org is a major step forward in national coordination of quail conservation and consistently measuring results across the range,” said NBCI Director Don McKenzie. “And it’s just the beginning of continued work by NBCI to provide essential technical tools and services to state and partner biologists.”

The site helps meet the demand for technical services related to the NBCI Coordinated Implementation Program (CIP), and other state and partner programs. The new site complements NBCI’s public outreach website, www.bringbackbobwhites.org, but meets state wildlife agencies’ desire for centralized and secure data management.  It includes information on the CIP monitoring protocols (breeding bird survey, fall covey counts and habitat assessments), the NBCI 2.0 Conservation Planning Tool and the NBCI Inventory, as well as the upcoming Quail 8 symposium next year in Tennessee. 

While serving many purposes for the NBCI states, the national database reduces individual state costs for data management, analysis and reporting, while the large pool of data increases the value of scientific analyses.

A few highlights:

  • The geospatial version of NBCI 2.0, known as the Biologist Ranking Information (BRI), provides access to NBCI state agencies’ priority bobwhite areas through an interactive web map (www.quailcount.or/briwebmap.html). BRI is also accessible to biologists in the field through a geo-location feature that extracts BRI information for the user’s location.
  • Monitoring protocols and training associated with implementing the NBCI CIP are well illustrated with V1.0 of a habitat assessment manual and various “how-to” videos that are continuous works in progress.
  • “For biologists only”–As a technical website some services are available only to participating partners, and a top request from state agencies was a centralized and secure database for quail and songbird abundance data. Quailcount.org offers an online data entry system for states participating in the CIP. As of March 2016, the NBCI database had over 10,000 observations.

Quailcount.org is also the primary website for the upcoming Quail 8 national technical conference. NBCI and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency are co-hosting the Eighth National Quail Symposium in Knoxville in July 2017. The preliminary program is published with abstracts for 80 presentations.  (Quail hunters will particularly like six abstracts viewable in the program that cover bird dogs and hunting efficiency).

About NBCI

Headquartered at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture’s Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, NBCI is an initiative of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) to elevate bobwhite quail recovery from an individual state-by-state proposition to a coordinated, range-wide leadership endeavor. The committee is comprised of representatives of 25 state wildlife agencies, various academic research institutions and private conservation organizations. Support for NBCI is provided by the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Program, state wildlife agencies, the University of Tennessee and Park Cities Quail. For more information, please visit www.bringbackbobwhites.org and find us on Facebook, YouTube and Slideshare.

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